Racial Justice

Racial Justice Discussion Group – Sept

On Saturday, September 26, 12-1:15 PM, we’ll meet online to discuss the book My Grandmother’s Hands, by Resmaa Menakem. All are welcome. This is our fourth session in an ongoing series of open discussions, supporting each other in being a positive force for racial justice.

“Menakem posits that racism is embedded in the hearts, souls, and reflexes of both blacks and whites in American society [and all people of color on the police force], and that the trauma inflicted on many as a result of this fact is harmful to all. Menakem then helps readers get inside the black experience to encounter everyday threats and the responses of fighting, fleeing, or freezing in order to begin the healing process. The guided exercises and social commentary help to pave the way for understanding one another and building a stronger community that benefits everyone. For all readers.” (Library Journal) 

Register HERE for this free event. All are welcome as we support each other in being a positive force for racial justice. 

Accept – Educate – Self-Inquire – Act

Recap of Session 3: Our third meeting (Aug 22) was on How To Be An Antiracist, by Ibram X. Kendi. Those of us who thought this was a book informing white people how to be an antiracist were surprised to learn all the ways the author uncovered racism within himself being raised black in America. We were moved as he wove his personal story in between informative reflections on history.

0

Racial Justice Discussion Group

Saturday, August 22, 12-1:15 PM

For our third session in this ongoing series of open discussions, we’ll meet online to discuss the book How To Be An Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi, “A groundbreaking approach to understanding and uprooting racism and inequality in our society—and in ourselves.” 

Register HERE for this free event. All are welcome as we support each other in being a positive force for racial justice. 

Accept – Educate – Self-Inquire – Act

Recap of Session 2: Our second meeting (July 18) was on Me and White Supremacy, by Layla Saad. Each participant spoke with vulnerability and deep care about the inquiries in this book, including realizations and personal challenges. Listening to each other’s reflections with embodied presence brought awareness of systemic racism to the forefront, similar to watching an educational film or reading an article.

Remember the 4 steps in the heading above, and the reminder: This is a marathon, not a sprint. It’s clear that racial justice work is lifelong work that will deepen over time. (Inspired by interview with Jennifer Hutton.)

0

Racial & Social Justice in Mindfulness Community

George Floyd’s murder by Minneapolis police spawned an awakening and call to action for many of us; Awakening to the naked truth of injustices and violence related to racism, injustice and privilege in our society, and the necessity to take action toward real change in deeply-embedded beliefs and systems.
In response to expressions of immense care in our community, and as part of my own commitment to make a positive difference, I invited our Mindfulness community to gather on Zoom on Saturday June 13 at 12 noon to reflect, connect, share and get inspired. 
45 people expressed interest and 27 attended. After a guided meditative reflection, a dozen people shared passionately from various perspectives on the path of awareness. The hour passed quickly, and although we may have just scratched the surface, it was heartening to see people show up, be present, and give voice to what is true.
Here are Racial & Social Justice Resources our community shared during and after the meeting.
DATE CHANGE: Join me on Saturday, July 11, July 18, 11AM to discuss the book Me and White Supremacy, by Layla Saad. Register Here (free)
“If we are all committed to doing the work that is ours to do, we have a chance of creating a world and a way of living that are closer to what we all desire for ourselves and one another.” ~ Layla Saad
0